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Self Employment Tax

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Self Employment Tax

Self employment tax 20. Self employment tax   Standard Deduction Table of Contents What's New Introduction Standard Deduction Amount Standard Deduction for Dependents Who Should ItemizeWhen to itemize. Self employment tax Married persons who filed separate returns. Self employment tax What's New Standard deduction increased. Self employment tax  The standard deduction for some taxpayers who do not itemize their deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040) is higher for 2013 than it was for 2012. Self employment tax The amount depends on your filing status. Self employment tax You can use the 2013 Standard Deduction Tables in this chapter to figure your standard deduction. Self employment tax Introduction This chapter discusses the following topics. Self employment tax How to figure the amount of your standard deduction. Self employment tax The standard deduction for dependents. Self employment tax Who should itemize deductions. Self employment tax Most taxpayers have a choice of either taking a standard deduction or itemizing their deductions. Self employment tax If you have a choice, you can use the method that gives you the lower tax. Self employment tax The standard deduction is a dollar amount that reduces your taxable income. Self employment tax It is a benefit that eliminates the need for many taxpayers to itemize actual deductions, such as medical expenses, charitable contributions, and taxes, on Schedule A (Form 1040). Self employment tax The standard deduction is higher for taxpayers who: Are 65 or older, or Are blind. Self employment tax You benefit from the standard deduction if your standard deduction is more than the total of your allowable itemized deductions. Self employment tax Persons not eligible for the standard deduction. Self employment tax   Your standard deduction is zero and you should itemize any deductions you have if: Your filing status is married filing separately, and your spouse itemizes deductions on his or her return, You are filing a tax return for a short tax year because of a change in your annual accounting period, or You are a nonresident or dual-status alien during the year. Self employment tax You are considered a dual-status alien if you were both a nonresident and resident alien during the year. Self employment tax Note. Self employment tax If you are a nonresident alien who is married to a U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax citizen or resident alien at the end of the year, you can choose to be treated as a U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax resident. Self employment tax (See Publication 519, U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Tax Guide for Aliens. Self employment tax ) If you make this choice, you can take the standard deduction. Self employment tax If an exemption for you can be claimed on another person's return (such as your parents' return), your standard deduction may be limited. Self employment tax See Standard Deduction for Dependents, later. Self employment tax Standard Deduction Amount The standard deduction amount depends on your filing status, whether you are 65 or older or blind, and whether an exemption can be claimed for you by another taxpayer. Self employment tax Generally, the standard deduction amounts are adjusted each year for inflation. Self employment tax The standard deduction amounts for most people are shown in Table 20-1. Self employment tax Decedent's final return. Self employment tax   The standard deduction for a decedent's final tax return is the same as it would have been had the decedent continued to live. Self employment tax However, if the decedent was not 65 or older at the time of death, the higher standard deduction for age cannot be claimed. Self employment tax Higher Standard Deduction for Age (65 or Older) If you are age 65 or older on the last day of the year and do not itemize deductions, you are entitled to a higher standard deduction. Self employment tax You are considered 65 on the day before your 65th birthday. Self employment tax Therefore, you can take a higher standard deduction for 2013 if you were born before January 2, 1949. Self employment tax Use Table 20-2 to figure the standard deduction amount. Self employment tax Higher Standard Deduction for Blindness If you are blind on the last day of the year and you do not itemize deductions, you are entitled to a higher standard deduction. Self employment tax Not totally blind. Self employment tax   If you are not totally blind, you must get a certified statement from an eye doctor (ophthalmologist or optometrist) that: You cannot see better than 20/200 in the better eye with glasses or contact lenses, or Your field of vision is 20 degrees or less. Self employment tax   If your eye condition is not likely to improve beyond these limits, the statement should include this fact. Self employment tax You must keep the statement in your records. Self employment tax   If your vision can be corrected beyond these limits only by contact lenses that you can wear only briefly because of pain, infection, or ulcers, you can take the higher standard deduction for blindness if you otherwise qualify. Self employment tax Spouse 65 or Older or Blind You can take the higher standard deduction if your spouse is age 65 or older or blind and: You file a joint return, or You file a separate return and can claim an exemption for your spouse because your spouse had no gross income and cannot be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. Self employment tax You cannot claim the higher standard deduction for an individual other than yourself and your spouse. Self employment tax Examples The following examples illustrate how to determine your standard deduction using Tables 20-1 and 20-2. Self employment tax Example 1. Self employment tax Larry, 46, and Donna, 33, are filing a joint return for 2013. Self employment tax Neither is blind, and neither can be claimed as a dependent. Self employment tax They decide not to itemize their deductions. Self employment tax They use Table 20-1. Self employment tax Their standard deduction is $12,200. Self employment tax Example 2. Self employment tax The facts are the same as in Example 1 except that Larry is blind at the end of 2013. Self employment tax Larry and Donna use Table 20-2. Self employment tax Their standard deduction is $13,400. Self employment tax Example 3. Self employment tax Bill and Lisa are filing a joint return for 2013. Self employment tax Both are over age 65. Self employment tax Neither is blind, and neither can be claimed as a dependent. Self employment tax If they do not itemize deductions, they use Table 20-2. Self employment tax Their standard deduction is $14,600. Self employment tax Standard Deduction for Dependents The standard deduction for an individual who can be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return is generally limited to the greater of: $1,000, or The individual's earned income for the year plus $350 (but not more than the regular standard deduction amount, generally $6,100). Self employment tax However, if the individual is 65 or older or blind, the standard deduction may be higher. Self employment tax If you (or your spouse, if filing jointly) can be claimed as a dependent on someone else's return, use Table 20-3 to determine your standard deduction. Self employment tax Earned income defined. Self employment tax   Earned income is salaries, wages, tips, professional fees, and other amounts received as pay for work you actually perform. Self employment tax    For purposes of the standard deduction, earned income also includes any part of a scholarship or fellowship grant that you must include in your gross income. Self employment tax See Scholarships and fellowships in chapter 12 for more information on what qualifies as a scholarship or fellowship grant. Self employment tax Example 1. Self employment tax Michael is single. Self employment tax His parents can claim an exemption for him on their 2013 tax return. Self employment tax He has interest income of $780 and wages of $150. Self employment tax He has no itemized deductions. Self employment tax Michael uses Table 20-3 to find his standard deduction. Self employment tax He enters $150 (his earned income) on line 1, $500 ($150 + $350) on line 3, $1,000 (the larger of $500 and $1,000) on line 5, and $6,100 on line 6. Self employment tax His standard deduction, on line 7a, is $1,000 (the smaller of $1,000 and $6,100). Self employment tax Example 2. Self employment tax Joe, a 22-year-old full-time college student, can be claimed as a dependent on his parents' 2013 tax return. Self employment tax Joe is married and files a separate return. Self employment tax His wife does not itemize deductions on her separate return. Self employment tax Joe has $1,500 in interest income and wages of $3,800. Self employment tax He has no itemized deductions. Self employment tax Joe finds his standard deduction by using Table 20-3. Self employment tax He enters his earned income, $3,800 on line 1. Self employment tax He adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $4,150 on line 3. Self employment tax On line 5, he enters $4,150, the larger of lines 3 and 4. Self employment tax Because Joe is married filing a separate return, he enters $6,100 on line 6. Self employment tax On line 7a he enters $4,150 as his standard deduction because it is smaller than $6,100, the amount on line 6. Self employment tax Example 3. Self employment tax Amy, who is single, can be claimed as a dependent on her parents' 2013 tax return. Self employment tax She is 18 years old and blind. Self employment tax She has interest income of $1,300 and wages of $2,900. Self employment tax She has no itemized deductions. Self employment tax Amy uses Table 20-3 to find her standard deduction. Self employment tax She enters her wages of $2,900 on line 1. Self employment tax She adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $3,250 on line 3. Self employment tax On line 5, she enters $3,250, the larger of lines 3 and 4. Self employment tax Because she is single, Amy enters $6,100 on line 6. Self employment tax She enters $3,250 on line 7a. Self employment tax This is the smaller of the amounts on lines 5 and 6. Self employment tax Because she checked one box in the top part of the worksheet, she enters $1,500 on line 7b. Self employment tax She then adds the amounts on lines 7a and 7b and enters her standard deduction of $4,750 on line 7c. Self employment tax Example 4. Self employment tax Ed is single. Self employment tax His parents can claim an exemption for him on their 2013 tax return. Self employment tax He has wages of $7,000, interest income of $500, and a business loss of $3,000. Self employment tax He has no itemized deductions. Self employment tax Ed uses Table 20-3 to figure his standard deduction. Self employment tax He enters $4,000 ($7,000 - $3,000) on line 1. Self employment tax He adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $4,350 on line 3. Self employment tax On line 5 he enters $4,350, the larger of lines 3 and 4. Self employment tax Because he is single, Ed enters $6,100 on line 6. Self employment tax On line 7a he enters $4,350 as his standard deduction because it is smaller than $6,100, the amount on line 6. Self employment tax Who Should Itemize You should itemize deductions if your total deductions are more than the standard deduction amount. Self employment tax Also, you should itemize if you do not qualify for the standard deduction, as discussed earlier under Persons not eligible for the standard deduction . Self employment tax You should first figure your itemized deductions and compare that amount to your standard deduction to make sure you are using the method that gives you the greater benefit. Self employment tax You may be subject to a limit on some of your itemized deductions if your adjusted gross income is more than: $250,000 if single ($275,000 if head of household, $300,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er); or $150,000 if married filing separately). Self employment tax See chapter 29 or the instructions for Schedule A (Form 1040) for more information on figuring the correct amount of your itemized deductions. Self employment tax When to itemize. Self employment tax   You may benefit from itemizing your deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040) if you: Do not qualify for the standard deduction, or the amount you can claim is limited, Had large uninsured medical and dental expenses during the year, Paid interest and taxes on your home, Had large unreimbursed employee business expenses or other miscellaneous deductions, Had large uninsured casualty or theft losses, Made large contributions to qualified charities, or Have total itemized deductions that are more than the standard deduction to which you otherwise are entitled. Self employment tax These deductions are explained in chapters 21–28. Self employment tax    If you decide to itemize your deductions, complete Schedule A and attach it to your Form 1040. Self employment tax Enter the amount from Schedule A, line 29, on Form 1040, line 40. Self employment tax Electing to itemize for state tax or other purposes. Self employment tax   Even if your itemized deductions are less than your standard deduction, you can elect to itemize deductions on your federal return rather than take the standard deduction. Self employment tax You may want to do this if, for example, the tax benefit of itemizing your deductions on your state tax return is greater than the tax benefit you lose on your federal return by not taking the standard deduction. Self employment tax To make this election, you must check the box on line 30 of Schedule A. Self employment tax Changing your mind. Self employment tax   If you do not itemize your deductions and later find that you should have itemized — or if you itemize your deductions and later find you should not have — you can change your return by filing Form 1040X, Amended U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Individual Income Tax Return. Self employment tax See Amended Returns and Claims for Refund in chapter 1 for more information on amended returns. Self employment tax Married persons who filed separate returns. Self employment tax   You can change methods of taking deductions only if you and your spouse both make the same changes. Self employment tax Both of you must file a consent to assessment for any additional tax either one may owe as a result of the change. Self employment tax    You and your spouse can use the method that gives you the lower total tax, even though one of you may pay more tax than you would have paid by using the other method. Self employment tax You both must use the same method of claiming deductions. Self employment tax If one itemizes deductions, the other should itemize because he or she will not qualify for the standard deduction. Self employment tax See Persons not eligible for the standard deduction , earlier. Self employment tax 2013 Standard Deduction Tables If you are married filing a separate return and your spouse itemizes deductions, or if you are a dual-status alien, you cannot take the standard deduction even if you were born before January 2, 1949, or are blind. Self employment tax Table 20-1. Self employment tax Standard Deduction Chart for Most People* If your filing status is. Self employment tax . Self employment tax . Self employment tax Your standard deduction is: Single or Married filing separately $6,100 Married filing jointly or Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child 12,200 Head of household 8,950 *Do not use this chart if you were born before January 2, 1949, are blind, or if someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent. Self employment tax Use Table 20-2 or 20-3 instead. Self employment tax Table 20-2. Self employment tax Standard Deduction Chart for People Born Before January 2, 1949, or Who are Blind Check the correct number of boxes below. Self employment tax Then go to the chart. Self employment tax You: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Your spouse, if claiming spouse's exemption: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Total number of boxes checked   IF  your filing status is. Self employment tax . Self employment tax . Self employment tax AND the number in the box above is. Self employment tax . Self employment tax . Self employment tax THEN your standard deduction is. Self employment tax . Self employment tax . Self employment tax Single 1 $7,600   2 9,100 Married filing jointly 1 $13,400 or Qualifying 2 14,600 widow(er) with 3 15,800 dependent child 4 17,000 Married filing 1 $7,300 separately 2 8,500   3 9,700   4 10,900 Head of household 1 $10,450   2 11,950 *If someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent, use Table 20-3 instead. Self employment tax Table 20-3. Self employment tax Standard Deduction Worksheet for Dependents Use this worksheet only if someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent. Self employment tax Check the correct number of boxes below. Self employment tax Then go to the worksheet. Self employment tax You:   Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Your spouse, if claiming spouse's exemption: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Total number of boxes checked 1. Self employment tax Enter your earned income (defined below). Self employment tax If none, enter -0-. Self employment tax 1. Self employment tax   2. Self employment tax Additional amount. Self employment tax 2. Self employment tax $350 3. Self employment tax Add lines 1 and 2. Self employment tax 3. Self employment tax   4. Self employment tax Minimum standard deduction. Self employment tax 4. Self employment tax $1,000 5. Self employment tax Enter the larger of line 3 or line 4. Self employment tax 5. Self employment tax   6. Self employment tax Enter the amount shown below for your filing status. Self employment tax Single or Married filing separately—$6,100 Married filing jointly—$12,200 Head of household—$8,950 6. Self employment tax   7. Self employment tax Standard deduction. Self employment tax         a. Self employment tax Enter the smaller of line 5 or line 6. Self employment tax If born after January 1, 1949, and not blind, stop here. Self employment tax This is your standard deduction. Self employment tax Otherwise, go on to line 7b. Self employment tax 7a. Self employment tax     b. Self employment tax If born before January 2, 1949, or blind, multiply $1,500 ($1,200 if married) by the number in the box above. Self employment tax 7b. Self employment tax     c. Self employment tax Add lines 7a and 7b. Self employment tax This is your standard deduction for 2013. Self employment tax 7c. Self employment tax   Earned income includes wages, salaries, tips, professional fees, and other compensation received for personal services you performed. Self employment tax It also includes any amount received as a scholarship that you must include in your income. Self employment tax Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications
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Beware: Offers to Skip a Payment

If your credit company invites you to skip a monthly payment without a penalty, it is not doing you a favor. You will still owe finance charges on your unpaid balance. And interest could be adding up on any purchases you make after the due date you skipped.

Beware: Teaser Rates

Some cards are advertised with very low introductory interest rates called teasers. The rate is good for a short period of time. If you know you can pay what you owe while the low rate is in effect, it could be a good deal. But if the teaser time runs out and you still owe money, you could end up paying a higher rate than you might have without the special introductory rate. Just one late payment could also cancel the teaser rate.

Beware: Credit Insurance

When you take out a loan for a big purchase, a salesperson may try to sell you credit insurance. Your credit card company may also encourage you to purchase credit insurance. The coverage may be promoted as a way for you to protect yourself if your property is damaged or lost. Other credit insurance offers promises to make loan payments if you are laid off, become disabled or die. It is almost always better to buy regular property, life or disability insurance instead of credit insurance.

Be Alert: 'Credit Repair' Scams

Beware! Before you sign up for fee based credit repair services, beware. Many of the promised services are either illegal or ones you can do for free by yourself. Before you sign up to work with these companies, here are some tidbits to keep in mind:

  • A credit repair company must give you a copy of the "Consumer Credit File Rights under State and Federal Law" before you sign a contract.
  • The company cannot perform any services until you have signed a written contract and completed a three day waiting period, during which time you can cancel the contract without paying any fees.
  • The company cannot charge you until it has completed the promised services, according to the Credit Repair Organizations Act.
  • It is illegal to erase timely and accurate negative information contained in your credit history.
  • Suggestions that you create a new credit history (also called file segregation) by requesting an Employer Identification Number from the IRS are also illegal.
  • You can work to solve your own credit challenges, by requesting a free copy of your credit report, and by working with creditors to dispute incorrect information.

CARD Act Protections for Consumers

The Credit Card Accountability Responsibility & Disclosure (CARD) Act brought about sweeping protections for consumers. Among other things, your credit card company:

Fees

  • Cannot change rates or fees without sending you a notice 45 days in advance in most cases.
  • Must give you the option of rejecting a fee increase, but be aware that the credit card company may close your account if you reject the fee increase and may require a higher monthly payment.
  • Cannot charge you a late payment fee of more than $25, regardless of how much you owe- unless one of your last six payments was late or the credit card company can justify a higher fee based on the cost of late payments.
  • Cannot charge a late payment fee that is greater than your minimum payment.
  • Cannot charge you an inactivity fee for not using your card.
  • Cannot charge you more than one fee for a single late payment or any other violation of your cardholder agreement.
  • Cannot charge you over-the-limit transaction fees unless you opt in, stating that you want to allow transactions that take you over your credit card limit. If the credit card company allows the transaction without your opt-in, it cannot charge you a fee.
  • Can impose only one fee per billing cycle for transactions that take you over your credit limit if you opt in to over-the-limit transactions. You can revoke your opt-in at any time.

Payments

  • Has to tell you how long it will take to pay off your balance if you make only minimum payments.
  • Must mail or deliver your credit card bill at least 21 days before your payment is due.
  • Must apply any payments above the minimum required amount to the balance with the highest interest rate, if you have more than one rate.

Interest Rates

  • Cannot increase your rate for the first 12 months after you open an account unless you have a variable interest rate or an introductory rate; you are more than 60 days late paying your bill; or you are in a workout agreement and don't make payments as arranged.
  • Cannot charge higher rates for purchases made before you receive notice of a new rate.
  • Cannot use the double-cycle billing method when calculating interest; interest can only be charged on balances within the current billing cycle.
  • Cannot increase your Annual Percentage Rate (APR) without explaining why it is doing so. If your credit card company increases your APR, it generally must re-evaluate that rate increase every six months. Under some circumstances, it may have to reduce your rate after the evaluation.

What's more, a credit card company can grant credit cards to consumers under age 21 only if they can show they are able to make payments or have a cosigner for the card. The Federal Reserve has more information about CARD Act protections.

The Self Employment Tax

Self employment tax Publication 561 - Additional Material Table of Contents Tax Publications for Individual Taxpayers and Commonly Used Tax Forms Tax Publications for Individual Taxpayers and Commonly Used Tax Forms. Self employment tax  Summary: This is a listing of tax publications and commonly used tax forms. Self employment tax The text states:Tax Publications for Individual Taxpayers. Self employment tax  See How to Get Tax Help for a variety of ways to get publications, including by computer, phone, and mail. Self employment tax General Guides. Self employment tax   1--Your Rights as a Taxpayer 17--Your Federal Income Tax (For Individuals) 334--Tax Guide for Small Business (For Individuals Who Use Schedule C or C-EZ) 509--Tax Calendars for 2007 553--Highlights of 2006 Tax Changes 910--IRS Guide to Free Tax Services Specialized Publications. Self employment tax   3--Armed Forces' Tax Guide 54--Tax Guide for U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Citizens and Residents Aliens Abroad 225--Farmer's Tax Guide 463--Travel, Entertainment, Gift, and Car Expenses 501--Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information 502--Medical and Dental Expenses 503--Child and Dependent Care Expenses 504--Divorced or Separated Individuals 505--Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax 514--Foreign Tax Credit for Individuals 516--U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Government Civilian Employees Stationed Abroad 517--Social Security and Other Information for Members of the Clergy and Religious Workers 519--U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Tax Guide for Aliens 520--Scholarships and Fellowships 521--Moving Expenses 523--Selling Your Home 524--Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled 525--Taxable and Nontaxable Income 526--Charitable Contributions 527--Residential Rental Property 529--Miscellaneous Deductions 530--Tax Information for First-Time Homeowners 531--Reporting Tip Income 536--Net Operating Losses (NOLs) for Individuals, Estates, and Trusts 537--Installment Sales 541--Partnerships 544--Sales and Other Dispositions of Assets 547--Casualties, Disasters, and Thefts 550--Investment Income and Expenses 551--Basis of Assets 552--Recordkeeping for Individuals 554--Older Americans' Tax Guide 555--Community Property 556--Examination of Returns, Appeal Rights, and Claims for Refund 559--Survivors, Executors, and Administrators 561--Determining the Value of Donated Property 564--Mutual Fund Distributions 570--Tax Guide for Individuals With Income From U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Possessions 571--Tax-Sheltered Annuity Plans (403(b) Plans) 575--Pension and Annuity Income 584--Casualty, Disaster, and Theft Loss Workbook (Personal-Use Property) 587--Business Use of Your Home (Including Use by Daycare Providers) 590--Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) 593--Tax Highlights for U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Citizens and Residents Going Abroad 594--What You Should Know About the IRS Collection Process 596--Earned Income Credit (EIC) 721--Tax Guide to U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Civil Service Retirement Benefits 901--U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Tax Treaties 907--Tax Highlights for Persons with Disabilities 908--Bankruptcy Tax Guide 915--Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits 919--How Do I Adjust My Tax Withholding? 925--Passive Activity and At-Risk Rules 926--Household Employer's Tax Guide 929--Tax Rules for Children and Dependents 936--Home Mortgage Interest Deduction 946--How to Depreciate Property 947--Practice Before the IRS and Power of Attorney 950--Introduction to Estate and Gift Taxes 967--The IRS Will Figure Your Tax 969--Health Savings Accounts and Other Tax-Favored Health Plans 970--Tax Benefits for Education 971--Innocent Spouse Relief 972--Child Tax Credit 1542--Per Diem Rates 1544--Reporting Cash Payments of Over $10,000 (Received in a Trade or Business) 1546--The Taxpayer Advocate Service of the IRS - How to Get Help With Unresolved Tax Problems Spanish Language Publications. Self employment tax   1SP--Derechos del Contribuyente 579SP--Cómo Preparar la Declaración de Impuesto Federal 594SP--Que es lo que Debemos Saber sobre el Proceso de Cobro del IRS 596SP--Crédito por Ingreso del Trabajo 850--English-Spanish Glossary of Words and Phrases Used in Publications Issued by the Internal Revenue Service 1544SP--Informe de Pagos en Efectivo en Exceso de $10,000 (Recibidos en una Ocupación o Negocio) Commonly Used Tax Forms. Self employment tax  See How To Get Tax Help for a variety of ways to get forms, including by computer, fax, phone, and mail. Self employment tax 1040--U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Individual Income Tax Return Schedule A&B--Itemized Deductions & Interest and Ordinary Dividends Schedule C--Profit or Loss From Business Schedule C-EZ--Net Profit From Business Schedule D--Capital Gains and Losses Schedule D-1--Continuation Sheet for Schedule D Schedule E--Supplemental Income and Loss Schedule EIC--Earned Income Credit Schedule F--Profit or Loss From Farming Schedule H--Household Employment Taxes Schedule J--Income Averaging for Farmers and Fishermen Schedule R--Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled Schedule SE--Self-Employment Tax 1040A--U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Individual Income Tax Return Schedule 1--Interest and Ordinary Dividends for Form 1040A Filers Schedule 2--Child and Dependent Care Expenses for Form 1040A Filers Schedule 3--Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled for Form 1040A Filers 1040EZ--Income Tax Return for Single and Joint Filers With No Dependents 1040-ES--Estimated Tax for Individuals 1040X--Amended U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Individual Income Tax Return 2106--Employee Business Expenses 2106-EZ--Unreimbursed Employee Business Expenses 2210--Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Individuals, Estates, and Trusts 2441--Child and Dependent Care Expenses 2848--Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative 3903--Moving Expenses 4562--Depreciation and Amortization 4868--Application for Automatic Extension of Time To File U. Self employment tax S. Self employment tax Individual Income Tax Return 4952--Investment Interest Expense Deduction 5329--Additional Taxes on Qualified Plans (Including IRAs) and Other Tax-Favored Accounts 6251--Alternative Minimum Tax--Individuals 8283--Noncash Charitable Contributions 8582--Passive Activity Loss Limitations 8606--Nondeductible IRAs 8812--Additional Child Tax Credit 8822--Change of Address 8829--Expenses for Business Use of Your Home 8863--Education Credits 9465--Installment Agreement Request Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications