File your Taxes for Free!
  • Get your maximum refund*
  • 100% accurate calculations guaranteed*

TurboTax Federal Free Edition - File Taxes Online

Don't let filing your taxes get you down! We'll help make it as easy as possible. With e-file and direct deposit, there's no faster way to get your refund!

Approved TurboTax Affiliate Site. TurboTax and TurboTax Online, among others, are registered trademarks and/or service marks of Intuit Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other parties' trademarks or service marks are the property of the respective owners.


© 2012 - 2018 All rights reserved.

This is an Approved TurboTax Affiliate site. TurboTax and TurboTax Online, among other are registered trademarks and/or service marks of Intuit, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other parties' trademarks or service marks are the property of the respective owners.
When discussing "Free e-file", note that state e-file is an additional fee. E-file fees do not apply to New York state returns. Prices are subject to change without notice. E-file and get your refund faster
*If you pay an IRS or state penalty or interest because of a TurboTax calculations error, we'll pay you the penalty and interest.
*Maximum Refund Guarantee - or Your Money Back: If you get a larger refund or smaller tax due from another tax preparation method, we'll refund the applicable TurboTax federal and/or state purchase price paid. TurboTax Federal Free Edition customers are entitled to payment of $14.99 and a refund of your state purchase price paid. Claims must be submitted within sixty (60) days of your TurboTax filing date and no later than 6/15/14. E-file, Audit Defense, Professional Review, Refund Transfer and technical support fees are excluded. This guarantee cannot be combined with the TurboTax Satisfaction (Easy) Guarantee. *We're so confident your return will be done right, we guarantee it. Accurate calculations guaranteed. If you pay an IRS or state penalty or interest because of a TurboTax calculations error, we'll pay you the penalty and interest.
https://turbotax.intuit.com/corp/guarantees.jsp

New Taxes

Www Freefilefillableforms ComFree Turbo Tax Filing 20121040ez Instructions1040ez Tax Form1040ez Free Online FileAmend Your TaxesFree Federal And State Tax Filing 2012Free Federal And State Tax Filing 20142011 Ez Tax Form2013 1040ez Instructions1040 Ez FormsH&r Block Free Tax FilingFree File State Tax1040 A Tax FormMy Free TaxFiling Tax ExtensionFillable 1040x Form2012 Tax FormsWww Ir GovFiling TaxesTax Credits For UnemployedFree Online Tax PreparationIrs Gov Free File1040es2007 Tax Forms1040 XStandard Deduction For Form 1040Tax Return 2011Where To File 2012 Federal Tax ReturnOnline Tax PreparationAmending A State Tax ReturnFree Tax PrepTurbotax Free For Military 2012How To Amend Tax ReturnsFillable State Tax FormsFile Taxes Online FreeEz1040 Form2012 940 Tax FormH&r Block Free State Tax FilingHow To Amend 2012 Taxes Online

New Taxes

New taxes 6. New taxes   Tip Income Table of Contents Introduction Useful Items - You may want to see: Keeping a Daily Tip RecordElectronic tip record. New taxes Reporting Tips to Your EmployerElectronic tip statement. New taxes Final report. New taxes Reporting Tips on Your Tax Return Allocated Tips Introduction This chapter is for employees who receive tips. New taxes All tips you receive are income and are subject to federal income tax. New taxes You must include in gross income all tips you receive directly, charged tips paid to you by your employer, and your share of any tips you receive under a tip-splitting or tip-pooling arrangement. New taxes The value of noncash tips, such as tickets, passes, or other items of value, is also income and subject to tax. New taxes Reporting your tip income correctly is not difficult. New taxes You must do three things. New taxes Keep a daily tip record. New taxes Report tips to your employer. New taxes Report all your tips on your income tax return. New taxes  This chapter will explain these three things and show you what to do on your tax return if you have not done the first two. New taxes This chapter will also show you how to treat allocated tips. New taxes For information on special tip programs and agreements, see Publication 531. New taxes Useful Items - You may want to see: Publication 531 Reporting Tip Income 1244 Employee's Daily Record of Tips and Report to Employer Form (and Instructions) 4137 Social Security and Medicare Tax on Unreported Tip Income 4070 Employee's Report of Tips to Employer Keeping a Daily Tip Record Why keep a daily tip record. New taxes   You must keep a daily tip record so you can: Report your tips accurately to your employer, Report your tips accurately on your tax return, and Prove your tip income if your return is ever questioned. New taxes How to keep a daily tip record. New taxes   There are two ways to keep a daily tip record. New taxes You can either: Write information about your tips in a tip diary, or Keep copies of documents that show your tips, such as restaurant bills and credit or debit card charge slips. New taxes You should keep your daily tip record with your tax or other personal records. New taxes You must keep your records for as long as they are important for administration of the federal tax law. New taxes For information on how long to keep records, see How long to keep records in chapter 1. New taxes    If you keep a tip diary, you can use Form 4070A, Employee's Daily Record of Tips. New taxes To get Form 4070A, ask the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) or your employer for Publication 1244. New taxes Also, Publication 1244 is available online at www. New taxes irs. New taxes gov/pub/irs-pdf/p1244. New taxes pdf. New taxes Publication 1244 includes a 1-year supply of Form 4070A. New taxes Each day, write in the information asked for on the form. New taxes   In addition to the information asked for on Form 4070A, you also need to keep a record of the date and value of any noncash tips you get, such as tickets, passes, or other items of value. New taxes Although you do not report these tips to your employer, you must report them on your tax return. New taxes   If you do not use Form 4070A, start your records by writing your name, your employer's name, and the name of the business (if it is different from your employer's name). New taxes Then, each workday, write the date and the following information. New taxes Cash tips you get directly from customers or from other employees. New taxes Tips from credit and debit card charge customers that your employer pays you. New taxes The value of any noncash tips you get, such as tickets, passes, or other items of value. New taxes The amount of tips you paid out to other employees through tip pools or tip splitting, or other arrangements, and the names of the employees to whom you paid the tips. New taxes Electronic tip record. New taxes   You can use an electronic system provided by your employer to record your daily tips. New taxes If you do, you must receive and keep a paper copy of this record. New taxes Service charges. New taxes    Do not write in your tip diary the amount of any service charge that your employer adds to a customer's bill and then pays to you and treats as wages. New taxes This is part of your wages, not a tip. New taxes See examples below. New taxes Example 1. New taxes Good Food Restaurant adds an 18% charge to the bill for parties of 6 or more customers. New taxes Jane’s bill for food and beverages for her party of 8 includes an amount on the tip line equal to 18% of the charges for food and beverages, and the total includes this amount. New taxes Because Jane did not have an unrestricted right to determine the amount on the “tip line,” the 18% charge is considered a service charge. New taxes Do not include the 18% charge in your tip diary. New taxes Service charges that are paid to you are considered wages, not tips. New taxes Example 2. New taxes Good Food Restaurant also includes sample calculations of tip amounts at the bottom of its bills for food and beverages provided to customers. New taxes David’s bill includes a blank “tip line,” with sample tip calculations of 15%, 18%, and 20% of his charges for food and beverages at the bottom of the bill beneath the signature line. New taxes Because David is free to enter any amount on the “tip line” or leave it blank, any amount he includes is considered a tip. New taxes Be sure to include this amount in your tip diary. New taxes Reporting Tips to Your Employer Why report tips to your employer. New taxes   You must report tips to your employer so that: Your employer can withhold federal income tax and social security, Medicare, Additional Medicare, or railroad retirement taxes, Your employer can report the correct amount of your earnings to the Social Security Administration or Railroad Retirement Board (which affects your benefits when you retire or if you become disabled, or your family's benefits if you die), and You can avoid the penalty for not reporting tips to your employer (explained later). New taxes What tips to report. New taxes   Report to your employer only cash, check, and debit and credit card tips you receive. New taxes   If your total tips for any 1 month from any one job are less than $20, do not report the tips for that month to that employer. New taxes   If you participate in a tip-splitting or tip-pooling arrangement, report only the tips you receive and retain. New taxes Do not report to your employer any portion of the tips you receive that you pass on to other employees. New taxes However, you must report tips you receive from other employees. New taxes    Do not report the value of any noncash tips, such as tickets or passes, to your employer. New taxes You do not pay social security, Medicare, Additional Medicare or railroad retirement taxes on these tips. New taxes How to report. New taxes    If your employer does not give you any other way to report tips, you can use Form 4070. New taxes Fill in the information asked for on the form, sign and date the form, and give it to your employer. New taxes To get a 1-year supply of the form, ask the IRS or your employer for Publication 1244. New taxes   If you do not use Form 4070, give your employer a statement with the following information. New taxes Your name, address, and social security number. New taxes Your employer's name, address, and business name (if it is different from your employer's name). New taxes The month (or the dates of any shorter period) in which you received tips. New taxes The total tips required to be reported for that period. New taxes You must sign and date the statement. New taxes Be sure to keep a copy with your tax or other personal records. New taxes   Your employer may require you to report your tips more than once a month. New taxes However, the statement cannot cover a period of more than 1 calendar month. New taxes Electronic tip statement. New taxes   Your employer can have you furnish your tip statements electronically. New taxes When to report. New taxes   Give your report for each month to your employer by the 10th of the next month. New taxes If the 10th falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, give your employer the report by the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. New taxes Example. New taxes You must report your tips received in September 2014 by October 10, 2014. New taxes Final report. New taxes   If your employment ends during the month, you can report your tips when your employment ends. New taxes Penalty for not reporting tips. New taxes   If you do not report tips to your employer as required, you may be subject to a penalty equal to 50% of the social security, Medicare, and Additional Medicare taxes or railroad retirement tax you owe on the unreported tips. New taxes (For information about these taxes, see Reporting social security, Medicare, Additional Medicare, or railroad retirement taxes on tips not reported to your employer under Reporting Tips on Your Tax Return, later. New taxes ) The penalty amount is in addition to the taxes you owe. New taxes   You can avoid this penalty if you can show reasonable cause for not reporting the tips to your employer. New taxes To do so, attach a statement to your return explaining why you did not report them. New taxes Giving your employer money for taxes. New taxes   Your regular pay may not be enough for your employer to withhold all the taxes you owe on your regular pay plus your reported tips. New taxes If this happens, you can give your employer money until the close of the calendar year to pay the rest of the taxes. New taxes   If you do not give your employer enough money, your employer will apply your regular pay and any money you give in the following order. New taxes All taxes on your regular pay. New taxes Social security, Medicare, and Additional Medicare taxes or railroad retirement taxes on your reported tips. New taxes Federal, state, and local income taxes on your reported tips. New taxes    Any taxes that remain unpaid can be collected by your employer from your next paycheck. New taxes If withholding taxes remain uncollected at the end of the year, you may be subject to a penalty for underpayment of estimated taxes. New taxes See Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax, for more information. New taxes    Uncollected taxes. New taxes You must report on your tax return any social security and Medicare taxes or railroad retirement tax that remained uncollected at the end of 2013. New taxes These uncollected taxes will be shown on your 2013 Form W-2. New taxes See Reporting uncollected social security, Medicare, or railroad retirement taxes on tips reported to your employer under Reporting Tips on Your Tax Return, later. New taxes Reporting Tips on Your Tax Return How to report tips. New taxes    Report your tips with your wages on Form 1040, line 7; Form 1040A, line 7; or Form 1040EZ, line 1. New taxes What tips to report. New taxes   You must report all tips you received in 2013 on your tax return, including both cash tips and noncash tips. New taxes Any tips you reported to your employer for 2013 are included in the wages shown in box 1 of your Form W-2. New taxes Add to the amount in box 1 only the tips you did not report to your employer. New taxes    If you received $20 or more in cash and charge tips in a month and did not report all of those tips to your employer, see Reporting social security, Medicare, Additional Medicare, or railroad retirement taxes on tips not reported to your employer, later. New taxes    If you did not keep a daily tip record as required and an amount is shown in box 8 of your Form W-2, see Allocated Tips, later. New taxes   If you kept a daily tip record and reported tips to your employer as required under the rules explained earlier, add the following tips to the amount in box 1 of your Form W-2. New taxes Cash and charge tips you received that totaled less than $20 for any month. New taxes The value of noncash tips, such as tickets, passes, or other items of value. New taxes Example. New taxes Ben Smith began working at the Blue Ocean Restaurant (his only employer in 2013) on June 30 and received $10,000 in wages during the year. New taxes Ben kept a daily tip record showing that his tips for June were $18 and his tips for the rest of the year totaled $7,000. New taxes He was not required to report his June tips to his employer, but he reported all of the rest of his tips to his employer as required. New taxes Ben's Form W-2 from Blue Ocean Restaurant shows $17,000 ($10,000 wages plus $7,000 reported tips) in box 1. New taxes He adds the $18 unreported tips to that amount and reports $17,018 as wages on his tax return. New taxes Reporting social security, Medicare, Additional Medicare, or railroad retirement taxes on tips not reported to your employer. New taxes    If you received $20 or more in cash and charge tips in a month from any one job and did not report all of those tips to your employer, you must report the social security, Medicare, and Additional Medicare taxes on the unreported tips as additional tax on your return. New taxes To report these taxes, you must file a return even if you would not otherwise have to file. New taxes You must use Form 1040. New taxes (You cannot file Form 1040EZ or Form 1040A. New taxes )    Use Form 4137 to figure social security and Medicare taxes. New taxes Enter the tax on your return as instructed, and attach the completed Form 4137 to your return. New taxes Use Form 8959 to figure Additional Medicare Tax. New taxes    If you are subject to the Railroad Retirement Tax Act, you cannot use Form 4137 to pay railroad retirement tax on unreported tips. New taxes To get railroad retirement credit, you must report tips to your employer. New taxes Reporting uncollected social security, Medicare, or railroad retirement taxes on tips reported to your employer. New taxes   You may have uncollected taxes if your regular pay was not enough for your employer to withhold all the taxes you owe and you did not give your employer enough money to pay the rest of the taxes. New taxes For more information, see Giving your employer money for taxes , under Reporting Tips to Your Employer, earlier. New taxes   If your employer could not collect all the social security and Medicare taxes or railroad retirement tax you owe on tips reported for 2013, the uncollected taxes will be shown in box 12 of your Form W-2 (codes A and B). New taxes You must report these amounts as additional tax on your return. New taxes Unlike the uncollected portion of the regular (1. New taxes 45%) Medicare tax, the uncollected Additional Medicare Tax is not reported in box 12 of Form W-2 with code B. New taxes    To report these uncollected taxes, you must file a return even if you would not otherwise have to file. New taxes You must report these taxes on Form 1040, line 60. New taxes See the instructions for Form 1040, line 60. New taxes (You cannot file Form 1040EZ or Form 1040A. New taxes ) Allocated Tips If your employer allocated tips to you, they are shown separately in box 8 of your Form W-2. New taxes They are not included in box 1 with your wages and reported tips. New taxes If box 8 is blank, this discussion does not apply to you. New taxes What are allocated tips. New taxes   These are tips that your employer assigned to you in addition to the tips you reported to your employer for the year. New taxes Your employer will have done this only if: You worked in an establishment (restaurant, cocktail lounge, or similar business) that must allocate tips to employees, and The tips you reported to your employer were less than your share of 8% of food and drink sales. New taxes No income, social security, Medicare, Additional Medicare or railroad retirement taxes are withheld on allocated tips. New taxes How were your allocated tips figured. New taxes   The tips allocated to you are your share of an amount figured by subtracting the reported tips of all employees from 8% (or an approved lower rate) of food and drink sales (other than carryout sales and sales with a service charge of 10% or more). New taxes Your share of that amount was figured using either a method provided by an employer-employee agreement or a method provided by IRS regulations based on employees' sales or hours worked. New taxes For information about the exact allocation method used, ask your employer. New taxes Must you report your allocated tips on your tax return. New taxes   You must report all tips you received in 2013 on your tax return, including both cash tips and noncash tips. New taxes Any tips you reported to your employer for 2013 are included in the wages shown in box 1 of your Form W-2. New taxes Add to the amount in box 1 only the tips you did not report to your employer. New taxes This should include any allocated tips shown in box 8 on your Form(s) W-2, unless you have adequate records to show that you received less tips in the year than the allocated figures. New taxes   See What tips to report under Reporting Tips on Your Tax Return, and Keeping a Daily Tip Record , earlier. New taxes How to report allocated tips. New taxes   Report the amount in box 1 and the allocated tips in box 8 of your Form(s) W-2 as wages on Form 1040, line 7; Form 1040NR, line 8; or Form 1040NR-EZ, line 3. New taxes (You cannot file Form 1040A or Form 1040EZ when you have allocated tips. New taxes )    Because social security, Medicare, and Additional Medicare taxes were not withheld from the allocated tips, you must report those taxes as additional tax on your return. New taxes Complete Form 4137, and include the allocated tips on line 1 of the form. New taxes See Reporting social security, Medicare, Additional Medicare, or railroad retirement taxes on tips not reported to your employer under Reporting Tips on Your Tax Return, earlier. New taxes Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications
Print - Click this link to Print this page

IRS Alerta sobre Nueva Estafa de “Phishing” Que Falsamente Alega Venir del Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente

Video de YouTube del IRS : 
Consejo Tributario: Phishing-Malware

IR-2014-39SP, 28 de marzo de 2014

WASHINGTON — El Servicio de Impuestos Internos (IRS) alertó hoy al público de una nueva estafa por correo electrónico que pesca información usando la práctica conocida como "phishing".  Los correos electrónicos parecen provenir del Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente (TAS, por sus siglas en inglés), e incluyen números de casos ficticios.

Los emails falsos pudieran incluir el siguiente mensaje: Su ingreso reportado del 2013 ha sido seleccionado para una revisión debido a un error del procesamiento de documentos. Su caso ha sido referido al Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente para asistencia con su resolución. Para evitar demoras en el procesamiento de su presentación del 2013, contacte al Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente para asistencia con la resolución.

Al destinatario se le indica que haga clic en enlaces que supuestamente proveen información sobre el "defensor" asignado al caso o donde se les permite "revisar el ingreso reportado". Los enlaces conllevan a páginas web que solicitan información personal.

Los contribuyentes que reciben estos mensajes no deben responder al correo electrónico ni hacer clic en los enlaces. Sin embargo, deben reenviar las estafas por correo electrónico a phishing@irs.gov. Para más información, visite la página del IRS acerca de Phishing.

El Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente es una organización legítima del IRS que ayuda a los contribuyentes a resolver asuntos de impuestos federales que no han sido resueltos mediante los canales normales de la agencia.  El IRS, incluyendo al Servicio del Defensor al Contribuyente no inicia contacto con los contribuyentes a través de correo electrónico, textos, ni mediante ningún tipo de red social.

‪Para más información acerca de estafas a las que estar alerta vea la lista de la “Docena Sucia” en IRS.gov.

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 28-Mar-2014

The New Taxes

New taxes 9. New taxes   Education Exception to Additional Tax on Early IRA Distributions Table of Contents Introduction Who Is Eligible Figuring the Amount Not Subject to the 10% Tax Reporting Early Distributions Introduction Generally, if you take a distribution from your IRA before you reach age 59½, you must pay a 10% additional tax on the early distribution. New taxes This applies to any IRA you own, whether it is a traditional IRA (including a SEP-IRA), a Roth IRA, or a SIMPLE IRA. New taxes The additional tax on an early distribution from a SIMPLE IRA may be as high as 25%. New taxes See Publication 560, Retirement Plans for Small Business, for information on SEP-IRAs, and Publication 590, for information about all other IRAs. New taxes However, you can take distributions from your IRAs for qualified higher education expenses without having to pay the 10% additional tax. New taxes You may owe income tax on at least part of the amount distributed, but you may not have to pay the 10% additional tax. New taxes Generally, if the taxable part of the distribution is less than or equal to the adjusted qualified education expenses (AQEE), none of the distribution is subject to the additional tax. New taxes If the taxable part of the distribution is more than the AQEE, only the excess is subject to the additional tax. New taxes Who Is Eligible You can take a distribution from your IRA before you reach age 59½ and not have to pay the 10% additional tax if, for the year of the distribution, you pay qualified education expenses for: yourself, your spouse, or your or your spouse's child, foster child, adopted child, or descendant of any of them. New taxes Qualified education expenses. New taxes   For purposes of the 10% additional tax, these expenses are tuition, fees, books, supplies, and equipment required for enrollment or attendance at an eligible educational institution. New taxes They also include expenses for special needs services incurred by or for special needs students in connection with their enrollment or attendance. New taxes   In addition, if the student is at least a half-time student, room and board are qualified education expenses. New taxes   The expense for room and board qualifies only to the extent that it is not more than the greater of the following two amounts. New taxes The allowance for room and board, as determined by the eligible educational institution, that was included in the cost of attendance (for federal financial aid purposes) for a particular academic period and living arrangement of the student. New taxes The actual amount charged if the student is residing in housing owned or operated by the eligible educational institution. New taxes You will need to contact the eligible educational institution for qualified room and board costs. New taxes Eligible educational institution. New taxes   An eligible educational institution is any college, university, vocational school, or other postsecondary educational institution eligible to participate in a student aid program administered by the U. New taxes S. New taxes Department of Education. New taxes It includes virtually all accredited public, nonprofit, and proprietary (privately owned profit-making) postsecondary institutions. New taxes The educational institution should be able to tell you if it is an eligible educational institution. New taxes   Certain educational institutions located outside the United States also participate in the U. New taxes S. New taxes Department of Education's Federal Student Aid (FSA) programs. New taxes Half-time student. New taxes   A student is enrolled “at least half-time” if he or she is enrolled for at least half the full-time academic work load for the course of study the student is pursuing as determined under the standards of the school where the student is enrolled. New taxes Figuring the Amount Not Subject to the 10% Tax To determine the amount of your distribution that is not subject to the 10% additional tax, first figure your adjusted qualified education expenses. New taxes You do this by reducing your total qualified education expenses by any tax-free educational assistance, which includes: Expenses used to figure the tax-free portion of distributions from a Coverdell education savings account (ESA) (see Distributions in chapter 7, Coverdell Education Savings Account), The tax-free part of scholarships and fellowships (see Tax-Free Scholarships and Fellowships in chapter 1, Scholarships, Fellowships, Grants, and Tuition Reductions), Pell grants (see Pell Grants and Other Title IV Need-Based Education Grants in chapter 1, Scholarships, Fellowships, Grants, and Tuition Reductions), Veterans' educational assistance (see Veterans' Benefits in chapter 1, Scholarships, Fellowships, Grants, and Tuition Reductions), Employer-provided educational assistance (see chapter 11, Employer-Provided Educational Assistance ), and Any other nontaxable (tax-free) payments (other than gifts or inheritances) received as educational assistance. New taxes Do not reduce the qualified education expenses by amounts paid with funds the student receives as: Payment for services, such as wages, A loan, A gift, An inheritance given to either the student or the individual making the withdrawal, or A withdrawal from personal savings (including savings from a qualified tuition program (QTP)). New taxes If your IRA distribution is equal to or less than your adjusted qualified education expenses, you are not subject to the 10% additional tax. New taxes Example 1. New taxes In 2013, Erin (age 32) took a year off from teaching to attend graduate school full-time. New taxes She paid $5,800 of qualified education expenses from the following sources. New taxes   Employer-provided educational assistance  (tax free) $5,000     Early distribution from IRA (includes $500 taxable earnings) 3,200           Before Erin can determine if she must pay the 10% additional tax on her IRA distribution, she must reduce her total qualified education expenses. New taxes   Total qualified education expenses $5,800     Minus: Tax-free educational assistance −5,000     Equals: Adjusted qualified  education expenses (AQEE) $ 800   Because Erin's AQEE ($800) are more than the taxable portion of her IRA distribution ($500), she does not have to pay the 10% additional tax on any part of this distribution. New taxes However, she must include the $500 taxable earnings in her gross income subject to income tax. New taxes Example 2. New taxes Assume the same facts as in Example 1 , except that Erin deducted some of the contributions to her IRA, so the taxable part of her early distribution is higher by $1,000. New taxes This must be included in her income subject to income tax. New taxes The taxable part of Erin's IRA distribution ($1,000) is larger than her $800 AQEE. New taxes Therefore, she must pay the 10% additional tax on $200, the taxable part of her distribution ($1,000) that is more than her qualified education expenses ($800). New taxes She does not have to pay the 10% additional tax on the remaining $800 of her taxable distribution. New taxes Reporting Early Distributions By January 31, 2014, the payer of your IRA distribution should send you Form 1099-R, Distributions From Pensions, Annuities, Retirement or Profit-Sharing Plans, IRAs, Insurance Contracts, etc. New taxes The information on this form will help you determine how much of your distribution is taxable for income tax purposes and how much is subject to the 10% additional tax. New taxes If you received an early distribution from your IRA, you must report the taxable earnings on Form 1040, line 15b (Form 1040NR, line 16b). New taxes Then, if you qualify for an exception for qualified higher education expenses, you must file Form 5329 to show how much, if any, of your early distribution is subject to the 10% additional tax. New taxes See the Instructions for Form 5329, Part I, for help in completing the form and entering the results on Form 1040 or 1040NR. New taxes There are many other situations in which Form 5329 is required. New taxes If, during 2013, you had other distributions from IRAs or qualified retirement plans, or have made excess contributions to certain tax-favored accounts, see the instructions for line 58 (Form 1040) or line 56 (Form 1040NR) to determine if you must file Form 5329. New taxes Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications