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2014 Tax Forms

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2014 Tax Forms

2014 tax forms 10. 2014 tax forms   Retirement Savings Contributions Credit (Saver's Credit) Table of Contents Full-time student. 2014 tax forms Adjusted gross income. 2014 tax forms Distributions received by spouse. 2014 tax forms Testing period. 2014 tax forms If you or your employer make eligible contributions (defined later) to a retirement plan, you may be able to take a credit of up to $1,000 (up to $2,000 if filing jointly). 2014 tax forms This credit could reduce the federal income tax you pay dollar for dollar. 2014 tax forms Can you claim the credit?   If you or your employer make eligible contributions to a retirement plan, you can claim the credit if all of the following apply. 2014 tax forms You are not under age 18. 2014 tax forms You are not a full-time student (explained next). 2014 tax forms No one else, such as your parent(s), claims an exemption for you on their tax return. 2014 tax forms Your adjusted gross income (defined later) is not more than: $59,000 for 2013 ($60,000 for 2014) if your filing status is married filing jointly, $44,250 for 2013 ($45,000 for 2014) if your filing status is head of household (with qualifying person), or $29,500 for 2013 ($30,000 for 2014) if your filing status is single, married filing separately, or qualifying widow(er) with dependent child. 2014 tax forms Full-time student. 2014 tax forms   You are a full-time student if, during some part of each of 5 calendar months (not necessarily consecutive) during the calendar year, you are either: A full-time student at a school that has a regular teaching staff, course of study, and regularly enrolled body of students in attendance, or A student taking a full-time, on-farm training course given by either a school that has a regular teaching staff, course of study, and regularly enrolled body of students in attendance, or a state, county, or local government. 2014 tax forms You are a full-time student if you are enrolled for the number of hours or courses the school considers to be full-time. 2014 tax forms Adjusted gross income. 2014 tax forms   This is generally the amount on line 38 of your 2013 Form 1040 or line 22 of your 2013 Form 1040A. 2014 tax forms However, you must add to that amount any exclusion or deduction claimed for the year for: Foreign earned income, Foreign housing costs, Income for bona fide residents of American Samoa, and Income from Puerto Rico. 2014 tax forms Eligible contributions. 2014 tax forms   These include: Contributions to a traditional or Roth IRA, Elective deferrals, including amounts designated as after-tax Roth contributions, to: A 401(k) plan (including a SIMPLE 401(k)), A section 403(b) annuity, An eligible deferred compensation plan of a state or local government (a governmental 457 plan), A SIMPLE IRA plan, or A salary reduction SEP, and Contributions to a section 501(c)(18) plan. 2014 tax forms They also include voluntary after-tax employee contributions to a tax-qualified retirement plan or a section 403(b) annuity. 2014 tax forms For purposes of the credit, an employee contribution will be voluntary as long as it is not required as a condition of employment. 2014 tax forms Reducing eligible contributions. 2014 tax forms   Reduce your eligible contributions (but not below zero) by the total distributions you received during the testing period (defined later) from any IRA, plan, or annuity included earlier under Eligible contributions. 2014 tax forms Also reduce your eligible contributions by any distribution from a Roth IRA that is not rolled over, even if the distribution is not taxable. 2014 tax forms      Do not reduce your eligible contributions by any of the following: The portion of any distribution which is not includible in income because it is a trustee-to-trustee transfer or a rollover distribution. 2014 tax forms Any distribution that is a return of a contribution to an IRA (including a Roth IRA) made during the year for which you claim the credit if: The distribution is made before the due date (including extensions) of your tax return for that year, You do not take a deduction for the contribution, and The distribution includes any income attributable to the contribution. 2014 tax forms Loans from a qualified employer plan treated as a distribution. 2014 tax forms Distributions of excess contributions or deferrals (and income attributable to excess contributions and deferrals). 2014 tax forms Distributions of dividends paid on stock held by an employee stock ownership plan under section 404(k). 2014 tax forms Distributions from an eligible retirement plan that are converted or rolled over to a Roth IRA. 2014 tax forms Distributions from a military retirement plan. 2014 tax forms Distributions received by spouse. 2014 tax forms   Any distributions your spouse receives are treated as received by you if you file a joint return with your spouse both for the year of the distribution and for the year for which you claim the credit. 2014 tax forms Testing period. 2014 tax forms   The testing period consists of: The year in which you claim the credit, The 2 years before the year in which you claim the credit, and The period after the end of the year in which you claim the credit and before the due date of the return (including extensions) for filing your return for the year in which you claimed the credit. 2014 tax forms Example. 2014 tax forms You and your spouse filed joint returns in 2011 and 2012, and plan to do so in 2013 and 2014. 2014 tax forms You received a taxable distribution from a qualified plan in 2011 and a taxable distribution from an eligible section 457(b) deferred compensation plan in 2012. 2014 tax forms Your spouse received taxable distributions from a Roth IRA in 2013 and tax-free distributions from a Roth IRA in 2014 before April 15. 2014 tax forms You made eligible contributions to an IRA in 2013 and you otherwise qualify for this credit. 2014 tax forms You must reduce the amount of your qualifying contributions in 2013 by the total of the distributions you and your spouse received in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. 2014 tax forms Maximum eligible contributions. 2014 tax forms   After your contributions are reduced, the maximum annual contribution on which you can base the credit is $2,000 per person. 2014 tax forms Effect on other credits. 2014 tax forms   The amount of this credit will not change the amount of your refundable tax credits. 2014 tax forms A refundable tax credit, such as the earned income credit or the additional child tax credit, is an amount that you would receive as a refund even if you did not otherwise owe any taxes. 2014 tax forms Maximum credit. 2014 tax forms   This is a nonrefundable credit. 2014 tax forms The amount of the credit in any year cannot be more than the amount of tax that you would otherwise pay (not counting any refundable credits or the adoption credit) in any year. 2014 tax forms If your tax liability is reduced to zero because of other nonrefundable credits, such as the education credits, then you will not be entitled to this credit. 2014 tax forms How to figure and report the credit. 2014 tax forms   The amount of the credit you can get is based on the contributions you make and your credit rate. 2014 tax forms The credit rate can be as low as 10% or as high as 50%. 2014 tax forms Your credit rate depends on your income and your filing status. 2014 tax forms See Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, to determine your credit rate. 2014 tax forms   The maximum contribution taken into account is $2,000 per person. 2014 tax forms On a joint return, up to $2,000 is taken into account for each spouse. 2014 tax forms   Figure the credit on Form 8880. 2014 tax forms Report the credit on line 50 of your Form 1040 or line 32 of your Form 1040A, and attach Form 8880 to your return. 2014 tax forms Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications
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  • Beware of IRS' 2010 'Dirty Dozen' Tax Scams
    The Internal Revenue Service issued its 2010 "dirty dozen" list of tax scams, including schemes involving return preparer fraud, hiding income offshore and phishing. "Taxpayers should be wary of anyone peddling scams that seem too good to be true," IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman said. "The IRS fights fraud by pursuing taxpayers who hide income abroad and by ensuring taxpayers get competent, ethical service from qualified professionals at home in the U.S."
  • Beware of Tax Scams
    The IRS wants taxpayers to be aware of tax scams. These scams are illegal and can lead to problems for taxpayers including significant penalties, interest and possible criminal prosecution. The schemes take several shapes, ranging from promises of large tax refunds to illegal ways of 'untaxing' yourself. Here are three important guidelines to keep in mind.
  • Electronic Federal Tax Payment System Cited in New E-mail Scam
    The Internal Revenue Service is warning taxpayers to be on the lookout for a new e-mail scam that uses the Treasury Department's Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS) as a hook to lure individuals into disclosing their personal information. The new e-mail scam, fraught with grammatical errors and typos, looks like a page from IRS.gov and claims to be from the "IRS Antifraud Comission" (sic), a fictitious group. The e-mail claims someone has enrolled the taxpayer's credit card in EFTPS bank account. The e-mail claims money was lost and "remaining founds" (sic) are blocked. Recipients are asked to click on a link that will help them recover their funds, but the subsequent site asks for personal information that the thieves could use to steal the taxpayer's identity.
  • Fraudulent E-Mail Purported to be Representing Congressional Interests
    The fraudulent email is sent from infowhitehouse3@ig.com.br. The author of the email claims to be representing several U.S. Legislative committees including the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Senate Committee on Appropriations, House Committee on Appropriations, and the House Committee of International Relations. This e-mail is a hoax. Do not follow the provided link.
  • FTC Cautions Consumers About Tax and Rebate Scams
    The Federal Trade Commission cautions consumers looking forward to rebate checks from the government that they may be targets of scammers out to steal their identity. The schemes work like this: consumers get a call or an e-mail claiming to be from the IRS, the Social Security Administration, or some other government agency, and claiming to need some bit of personal information to process the rebate check. Consumers may be asked to provide their social security number, bank account number, or another piece of personal information that a skillful crook can use to commit identity theft.
  • IRS Alerts Public to New Identity Theft Scams
    The IRS reminds consumers to avoid identity theft scams that use the IRS name, logo or web site in an attempt to convince taxpayers that the scam is a genuine communication from the IRS. Scammers may use other federal agency names, such as the U.S. Department of the Treasury.
  • IRS Warns of Phony e-Mails Claiming to Come from the IRS
    The Internal Revenue Service alerts taxpayers about Internet scams in which fraudulent e-mails are sent that appear to be from the IRS. The e-mails direct the consumer to a Web link that requests personal and financial information, such as Social Security, bank account or credit card numbers. The practice of tricking victims into revealing private personal and financial information over the Internet is known as 'phishing' for information.
  • IRS Warns Taxpayers of New E-mail Scams
    The Internal Revenue Service alterts taxpayers to the latest versions of an e- mail scam intended to fool people into believing they are under investigation by the agency's Criminal Investigation division.
  • Late Tax Scam Discovered; Free File Users Reminded to Use IRS.gov
    The IRS warns of a new tax scam on the Internet that lures taxpayers into filing tax information on a site masquerading as a member of the Free File Alliance. The IRS reminded taxpayers the only place to access the Free File program is through the official IRS.gov Web site.
  • OnGuardOnline.gov Urges Taxpayers to Contact the IRS If They Suspect Tax-Related Identity Theft
    OnGuardOnline.gov is informing consumers that an unexpected message from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) could be a warning sign that their Social Security number is being misused by an identity thief.
  • Simple Steps Can Prevent Tax Scams as Private Debt Collection Begins
    As the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) begins its private debt collection initiative, the tax agency reminds taxpayers there are several simple steps that can provide protection against scam artists. Scamsters try a variety of tricks to impersonate the IRS in hopes of tricking taxpayers into divulging personal or financial information or even conning people out of cash. Scam artists try to impersonate the IRS in person, by phone, by e-mail and over the Internet.
  • Some Telephone Tax Refund Requests May Be Too High; IRS Will Deny Improper Requests
    TheIRS reported that early filings show some individual taxpayers have requested large and apparently improper amounts for the special telephone tax refund. The IRS is investigating potential abuses in this area and will take prompt action against taxpayers who claim improper refund amounts and the return preparers who help them.
  • Tax Scammers Are Waiting to Take Your Money
    Tax-related scams are on the rise, according to consumer complaints tracked by the National Consumers League's Fraud Center. Reports of tax scams from consumers nearly quadrupled in 2007 from the year before, and the trend seems to be continuing into 2008. This time of year - and with the economy in the shape it's currently in - crooks see vulnerable prey in consumers feeling the squeeze at tax time

The 2014 Tax Forms

2014 tax forms Publication 541 - Additional Material Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications