File your Taxes for Free!
  • Get your maximum refund*
  • 100% accurate calculations guaranteed*

TurboTax Federal Free Edition - File Taxes Online

Don't let filing your taxes get you down! We'll help make it as easy as possible. With e-file and direct deposit, there's no faster way to get your refund!

Approved TurboTax Affiliate Site. TurboTax and TurboTax Online, among others, are registered trademarks and/or service marks of Intuit Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other parties' trademarks or service marks are the property of the respective owners.


© 2012 - 2018 All rights reserved.

This is an Approved TurboTax Affiliate site. TurboTax and TurboTax Online, among other are registered trademarks and/or service marks of Intuit, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other parties' trademarks or service marks are the property of the respective owners.
When discussing "Free e-file", note that state e-file is an additional fee. E-file fees do not apply to New York state returns. Prices are subject to change without notice. E-file and get your refund faster
*If you pay an IRS or state penalty or interest because of a TurboTax calculations error, we'll pay you the penalty and interest.
*Maximum Refund Guarantee - or Your Money Back: If you get a larger refund or smaller tax due from another tax preparation method, we'll refund the applicable TurboTax federal and/or state purchase price paid. TurboTax Federal Free Edition customers are entitled to payment of $14.99 and a refund of your state purchase price paid. Claims must be submitted within sixty (60) days of your TurboTax filing date and no later than 6/15/14. E-file, Audit Defense, Professional Review, Refund Transfer and technical support fees are excluded. This guarantee cannot be combined with the TurboTax Satisfaction (Easy) Guarantee. *We're so confident your return will be done right, we guarantee it. Accurate calculations guaranteed. If you pay an IRS or state penalty or interest because of a TurboTax calculations error, we'll pay you the penalty and interest.
https://turbotax.intuit.com/corp/guarantees.jsp

2010 Tax Amendment

2010 Tax Return FormIrs Form 1040x 2011Free 2008 Tax SoftwareHow To Fill Out Form 1040xFile State TaxesTaxact Login Tax Return Taxact Login Page Taxact Sign PageAmending Your TaxesTaxact 2010 ReturnIncometaxFile State And Federal Taxes Online FreeState Income Tax ReturnHow Do I Amend My 2011 Tax ReturnFreetaxusa Com1040a Tax FormFiling 2009 Taxes Late Online For FreeTax Act Amended ReturnW2 Book For 1040ezTax Amend FormTax Forms Download Ez 10402011 Form 1040ez2010 Tax Filing SoftwareFree State Tax Filing Software2012 1040How Do I Amend My TaxesFiling State Taxes For FreeFiling An AmendmentWhere To File Your State Taxes For FreeHow To File A 1040xAmend Taxes OnlineFile 2011 State TaxesTurbo Tax Free FileHow To File A 1040ez Tax FormTax Amendment Form 1040xWww Irs Gov Efile ComState Tax Forms 2012E-file 2012 TaxIrs Gov Free File 2011File 2006 Taxes Online FreeHow To File TaxesCan I File 2012 Taxes Online

2010 Tax Amendment

2010 tax amendment 20. 2010 tax amendment   Standard Deduction Table of Contents What's New Introduction Standard Deduction Amount Standard Deduction for Dependents Who Should ItemizeWhen to itemize. 2010 tax amendment Married persons who filed separate returns. 2010 tax amendment What's New Standard deduction increased. 2010 tax amendment  The standard deduction for some taxpayers who do not itemize their deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040) is higher for 2013 than it was for 2012. 2010 tax amendment The amount depends on your filing status. 2010 tax amendment You can use the 2013 Standard Deduction Tables in this chapter to figure your standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment Introduction This chapter discusses the following topics. 2010 tax amendment How to figure the amount of your standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment The standard deduction for dependents. 2010 tax amendment Who should itemize deductions. 2010 tax amendment Most taxpayers have a choice of either taking a standard deduction or itemizing their deductions. 2010 tax amendment If you have a choice, you can use the method that gives you the lower tax. 2010 tax amendment The standard deduction is a dollar amount that reduces your taxable income. 2010 tax amendment It is a benefit that eliminates the need for many taxpayers to itemize actual deductions, such as medical expenses, charitable contributions, and taxes, on Schedule A (Form 1040). 2010 tax amendment The standard deduction is higher for taxpayers who: Are 65 or older, or Are blind. 2010 tax amendment You benefit from the standard deduction if your standard deduction is more than the total of your allowable itemized deductions. 2010 tax amendment Persons not eligible for the standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment   Your standard deduction is zero and you should itemize any deductions you have if: Your filing status is married filing separately, and your spouse itemizes deductions on his or her return, You are filing a tax return for a short tax year because of a change in your annual accounting period, or You are a nonresident or dual-status alien during the year. 2010 tax amendment You are considered a dual-status alien if you were both a nonresident and resident alien during the year. 2010 tax amendment Note. 2010 tax amendment If you are a nonresident alien who is married to a U. 2010 tax amendment S. 2010 tax amendment citizen or resident alien at the end of the year, you can choose to be treated as a U. 2010 tax amendment S. 2010 tax amendment resident. 2010 tax amendment (See Publication 519, U. 2010 tax amendment S. 2010 tax amendment Tax Guide for Aliens. 2010 tax amendment ) If you make this choice, you can take the standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment If an exemption for you can be claimed on another person's return (such as your parents' return), your standard deduction may be limited. 2010 tax amendment See Standard Deduction for Dependents, later. 2010 tax amendment Standard Deduction Amount The standard deduction amount depends on your filing status, whether you are 65 or older or blind, and whether an exemption can be claimed for you by another taxpayer. 2010 tax amendment Generally, the standard deduction amounts are adjusted each year for inflation. 2010 tax amendment The standard deduction amounts for most people are shown in Table 20-1. 2010 tax amendment Decedent's final return. 2010 tax amendment   The standard deduction for a decedent's final tax return is the same as it would have been had the decedent continued to live. 2010 tax amendment However, if the decedent was not 65 or older at the time of death, the higher standard deduction for age cannot be claimed. 2010 tax amendment Higher Standard Deduction for Age (65 or Older) If you are age 65 or older on the last day of the year and do not itemize deductions, you are entitled to a higher standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment You are considered 65 on the day before your 65th birthday. 2010 tax amendment Therefore, you can take a higher standard deduction for 2013 if you were born before January 2, 1949. 2010 tax amendment Use Table 20-2 to figure the standard deduction amount. 2010 tax amendment Higher Standard Deduction for Blindness If you are blind on the last day of the year and you do not itemize deductions, you are entitled to a higher standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment Not totally blind. 2010 tax amendment   If you are not totally blind, you must get a certified statement from an eye doctor (ophthalmologist or optometrist) that: You cannot see better than 20/200 in the better eye with glasses or contact lenses, or Your field of vision is 20 degrees or less. 2010 tax amendment   If your eye condition is not likely to improve beyond these limits, the statement should include this fact. 2010 tax amendment You must keep the statement in your records. 2010 tax amendment   If your vision can be corrected beyond these limits only by contact lenses that you can wear only briefly because of pain, infection, or ulcers, you can take the higher standard deduction for blindness if you otherwise qualify. 2010 tax amendment Spouse 65 or Older or Blind You can take the higher standard deduction if your spouse is age 65 or older or blind and: You file a joint return, or You file a separate return and can claim an exemption for your spouse because your spouse had no gross income and cannot be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. 2010 tax amendment You cannot claim the higher standard deduction for an individual other than yourself and your spouse. 2010 tax amendment Examples The following examples illustrate how to determine your standard deduction using Tables 20-1 and 20-2. 2010 tax amendment Example 1. 2010 tax amendment Larry, 46, and Donna, 33, are filing a joint return for 2013. 2010 tax amendment Neither is blind, and neither can be claimed as a dependent. 2010 tax amendment They decide not to itemize their deductions. 2010 tax amendment They use Table 20-1. 2010 tax amendment Their standard deduction is $12,200. 2010 tax amendment Example 2. 2010 tax amendment The facts are the same as in Example 1 except that Larry is blind at the end of 2013. 2010 tax amendment Larry and Donna use Table 20-2. 2010 tax amendment Their standard deduction is $13,400. 2010 tax amendment Example 3. 2010 tax amendment Bill and Lisa are filing a joint return for 2013. 2010 tax amendment Both are over age 65. 2010 tax amendment Neither is blind, and neither can be claimed as a dependent. 2010 tax amendment If they do not itemize deductions, they use Table 20-2. 2010 tax amendment Their standard deduction is $14,600. 2010 tax amendment Standard Deduction for Dependents The standard deduction for an individual who can be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return is generally limited to the greater of: $1,000, or The individual's earned income for the year plus $350 (but not more than the regular standard deduction amount, generally $6,100). 2010 tax amendment However, if the individual is 65 or older or blind, the standard deduction may be higher. 2010 tax amendment If you (or your spouse, if filing jointly) can be claimed as a dependent on someone else's return, use Table 20-3 to determine your standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment Earned income defined. 2010 tax amendment   Earned income is salaries, wages, tips, professional fees, and other amounts received as pay for work you actually perform. 2010 tax amendment    For purposes of the standard deduction, earned income also includes any part of a scholarship or fellowship grant that you must include in your gross income. 2010 tax amendment See Scholarships and fellowships in chapter 12 for more information on what qualifies as a scholarship or fellowship grant. 2010 tax amendment Example 1. 2010 tax amendment Michael is single. 2010 tax amendment His parents can claim an exemption for him on their 2013 tax return. 2010 tax amendment He has interest income of $780 and wages of $150. 2010 tax amendment He has no itemized deductions. 2010 tax amendment Michael uses Table 20-3 to find his standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment He enters $150 (his earned income) on line 1, $500 ($150 + $350) on line 3, $1,000 (the larger of $500 and $1,000) on line 5, and $6,100 on line 6. 2010 tax amendment His standard deduction, on line 7a, is $1,000 (the smaller of $1,000 and $6,100). 2010 tax amendment Example 2. 2010 tax amendment Joe, a 22-year-old full-time college student, can be claimed as a dependent on his parents' 2013 tax return. 2010 tax amendment Joe is married and files a separate return. 2010 tax amendment His wife does not itemize deductions on her separate return. 2010 tax amendment Joe has $1,500 in interest income and wages of $3,800. 2010 tax amendment He has no itemized deductions. 2010 tax amendment Joe finds his standard deduction by using Table 20-3. 2010 tax amendment He enters his earned income, $3,800 on line 1. 2010 tax amendment He adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $4,150 on line 3. 2010 tax amendment On line 5, he enters $4,150, the larger of lines 3 and 4. 2010 tax amendment Because Joe is married filing a separate return, he enters $6,100 on line 6. 2010 tax amendment On line 7a he enters $4,150 as his standard deduction because it is smaller than $6,100, the amount on line 6. 2010 tax amendment Example 3. 2010 tax amendment Amy, who is single, can be claimed as a dependent on her parents' 2013 tax return. 2010 tax amendment She is 18 years old and blind. 2010 tax amendment She has interest income of $1,300 and wages of $2,900. 2010 tax amendment She has no itemized deductions. 2010 tax amendment Amy uses Table 20-3 to find her standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment She enters her wages of $2,900 on line 1. 2010 tax amendment She adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $3,250 on line 3. 2010 tax amendment On line 5, she enters $3,250, the larger of lines 3 and 4. 2010 tax amendment Because she is single, Amy enters $6,100 on line 6. 2010 tax amendment She enters $3,250 on line 7a. 2010 tax amendment This is the smaller of the amounts on lines 5 and 6. 2010 tax amendment Because she checked one box in the top part of the worksheet, she enters $1,500 on line 7b. 2010 tax amendment She then adds the amounts on lines 7a and 7b and enters her standard deduction of $4,750 on line 7c. 2010 tax amendment Example 4. 2010 tax amendment Ed is single. 2010 tax amendment His parents can claim an exemption for him on their 2013 tax return. 2010 tax amendment He has wages of $7,000, interest income of $500, and a business loss of $3,000. 2010 tax amendment He has no itemized deductions. 2010 tax amendment Ed uses Table 20-3 to figure his standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment He enters $4,000 ($7,000 - $3,000) on line 1. 2010 tax amendment He adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $4,350 on line 3. 2010 tax amendment On line 5 he enters $4,350, the larger of lines 3 and 4. 2010 tax amendment Because he is single, Ed enters $6,100 on line 6. 2010 tax amendment On line 7a he enters $4,350 as his standard deduction because it is smaller than $6,100, the amount on line 6. 2010 tax amendment Who Should Itemize You should itemize deductions if your total deductions are more than the standard deduction amount. 2010 tax amendment Also, you should itemize if you do not qualify for the standard deduction, as discussed earlier under Persons not eligible for the standard deduction . 2010 tax amendment You should first figure your itemized deductions and compare that amount to your standard deduction to make sure you are using the method that gives you the greater benefit. 2010 tax amendment You may be subject to a limit on some of your itemized deductions if your adjusted gross income is more than: $250,000 if single ($275,000 if head of household, $300,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er); or $150,000 if married filing separately). 2010 tax amendment See chapter 29 or the instructions for Schedule A (Form 1040) for more information on figuring the correct amount of your itemized deductions. 2010 tax amendment When to itemize. 2010 tax amendment   You may benefit from itemizing your deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040) if you: Do not qualify for the standard deduction, or the amount you can claim is limited, Had large uninsured medical and dental expenses during the year, Paid interest and taxes on your home, Had large unreimbursed employee business expenses or other miscellaneous deductions, Had large uninsured casualty or theft losses, Made large contributions to qualified charities, or Have total itemized deductions that are more than the standard deduction to which you otherwise are entitled. 2010 tax amendment These deductions are explained in chapters 21–28. 2010 tax amendment    If you decide to itemize your deductions, complete Schedule A and attach it to your Form 1040. 2010 tax amendment Enter the amount from Schedule A, line 29, on Form 1040, line 40. 2010 tax amendment Electing to itemize for state tax or other purposes. 2010 tax amendment   Even if your itemized deductions are less than your standard deduction, you can elect to itemize deductions on your federal return rather than take the standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment You may want to do this if, for example, the tax benefit of itemizing your deductions on your state tax return is greater than the tax benefit you lose on your federal return by not taking the standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment To make this election, you must check the box on line 30 of Schedule A. 2010 tax amendment Changing your mind. 2010 tax amendment   If you do not itemize your deductions and later find that you should have itemized — or if you itemize your deductions and later find you should not have — you can change your return by filing Form 1040X, Amended U. 2010 tax amendment S. 2010 tax amendment Individual Income Tax Return. 2010 tax amendment See Amended Returns and Claims for Refund in chapter 1 for more information on amended returns. 2010 tax amendment Married persons who filed separate returns. 2010 tax amendment   You can change methods of taking deductions only if you and your spouse both make the same changes. 2010 tax amendment Both of you must file a consent to assessment for any additional tax either one may owe as a result of the change. 2010 tax amendment    You and your spouse can use the method that gives you the lower total tax, even though one of you may pay more tax than you would have paid by using the other method. 2010 tax amendment You both must use the same method of claiming deductions. 2010 tax amendment If one itemizes deductions, the other should itemize because he or she will not qualify for the standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment See Persons not eligible for the standard deduction , earlier. 2010 tax amendment 2013 Standard Deduction Tables If you are married filing a separate return and your spouse itemizes deductions, or if you are a dual-status alien, you cannot take the standard deduction even if you were born before January 2, 1949, or are blind. 2010 tax amendment Table 20-1. 2010 tax amendment Standard Deduction Chart for Most People* If your filing status is. 2010 tax amendment . 2010 tax amendment . 2010 tax amendment Your standard deduction is: Single or Married filing separately $6,100 Married filing jointly or Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child 12,200 Head of household 8,950 *Do not use this chart if you were born before January 2, 1949, are blind, or if someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent. 2010 tax amendment Use Table 20-2 or 20-3 instead. 2010 tax amendment Table 20-2. 2010 tax amendment Standard Deduction Chart for People Born Before January 2, 1949, or Who are Blind Check the correct number of boxes below. 2010 tax amendment Then go to the chart. 2010 tax amendment You: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Your spouse, if claiming spouse's exemption: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Total number of boxes checked   IF  your filing status is. 2010 tax amendment . 2010 tax amendment . 2010 tax amendment AND the number in the box above is. 2010 tax amendment . 2010 tax amendment . 2010 tax amendment THEN your standard deduction is. 2010 tax amendment . 2010 tax amendment . 2010 tax amendment Single 1 $7,600   2 9,100 Married filing jointly 1 $13,400 or Qualifying 2 14,600 widow(er) with 3 15,800 dependent child 4 17,000 Married filing 1 $7,300 separately 2 8,500   3 9,700   4 10,900 Head of household 1 $10,450   2 11,950 *If someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent, use Table 20-3 instead. 2010 tax amendment Table 20-3. 2010 tax amendment Standard Deduction Worksheet for Dependents Use this worksheet only if someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent. 2010 tax amendment Check the correct number of boxes below. 2010 tax amendment Then go to the worksheet. 2010 tax amendment You:   Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Your spouse, if claiming spouse's exemption: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Total number of boxes checked 1. 2010 tax amendment Enter your earned income (defined below). 2010 tax amendment If none, enter -0-. 2010 tax amendment 1. 2010 tax amendment   2. 2010 tax amendment Additional amount. 2010 tax amendment 2. 2010 tax amendment $350 3. 2010 tax amendment Add lines 1 and 2. 2010 tax amendment 3. 2010 tax amendment   4. 2010 tax amendment Minimum standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment 4. 2010 tax amendment $1,000 5. 2010 tax amendment Enter the larger of line 3 or line 4. 2010 tax amendment 5. 2010 tax amendment   6. 2010 tax amendment Enter the amount shown below for your filing status. 2010 tax amendment Single or Married filing separately—$6,100 Married filing jointly—$12,200 Head of household—$8,950 6. 2010 tax amendment   7. 2010 tax amendment Standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment         a. 2010 tax amendment Enter the smaller of line 5 or line 6. 2010 tax amendment If born after January 1, 1949, and not blind, stop here. 2010 tax amendment This is your standard deduction. 2010 tax amendment Otherwise, go on to line 7b. 2010 tax amendment 7a. 2010 tax amendment     b. 2010 tax amendment If born before January 2, 1949, or blind, multiply $1,500 ($1,200 if married) by the number in the box above. 2010 tax amendment 7b. 2010 tax amendment     c. 2010 tax amendment Add lines 7a and 7b. 2010 tax amendment This is your standard deduction for 2013. 2010 tax amendment 7c. 2010 tax amendment   Earned income includes wages, salaries, tips, professional fees, and other compensation received for personal services you performed. 2010 tax amendment It also includes any amount received as a scholarship that you must include in your income. 2010 tax amendment Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications
Print - Click this link to Print this page

Income from Abroad is Taxable

Many United States (U.S.) citizens and resident aliens receive income from foreign sources. There have been recent reports about the interest of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in taxpayers with accounts in Liechtenstein. The interest of the IRS, however, extends beyond accounts in Liechtenstein to accounts anywhere in the world. Consequently, the IRS reminds you to report your worldwide income on your U.S. tax return.

If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien, you must report income from all sources within and outside of the U.S. This is true whether or not you receive a Form W-2 Wage and Tax Statement,  a Form 1099 (Information Return) or the foreign equivalents.    See Publication 525, Taxable and Nontaxable Income for more information.

Additionally, if you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien, the rules for filing income, estate and gift tax returns and for paying estimated tax are generally the same whether you are living in the U.S. or abroad.

Hiding Income Offshore

Not reporting income from foreign sources may be a crime.  The IRS and its international partners are pursuing those who hide income or assets offshore to evade taxes. Specially trained IRS examiners focus on aggressive international tax planning, including the abusive use of entities and structures established in foreign jurisdictions.  The goal is to ensure U.S. citizens and residents are accurately reporting their income and paying the correct tax. 

Foreign Financial Accounts

In addition to reporting your worldwide income, you must also report on your U.S. tax return whether you have any foreign bank or investment accounts.  The Bank Secrecy Act requires you to file a Form TD F 90-22.1, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR), if:

  • You have financial interest in, signature authority, or other authority over one or more accounts in a foreign country, and
  • The aggregate value of all foreign financial accounts exceeds $10,000 at any time during the calendar year.

More information on foreign financial account reporting requirements is in News Release FS-2007-15, Foreign Financial Accounts Reporting Requirements and Publication 4261, Do You have a Foreign Financial Account?

Consequences for Evading Taxes on Foreign Source Income

You will face serious consequences if the IRS finds you have unreported income or undisclosed foreign financial accounts.  These consequences can include not only the additional taxes, but also substantial penalties, interest, fines and even imprisonment.

Reporting Promoters of Off-Shore Tax Avoidance Schemes

The IRS encourages you to report promoters of off-shore tax avoidance schemes.  Whistleblowers who provide allegations of fraud to the IRS may be eligible for a reward by filing Form 211, Application for Award for Original Information, and following the procedures outlined in Notice 2008-4, Claims Submitted to the IRS Whistleblower Office under Section 7623.

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 29-Nov-2013

The 2010 Tax Amendment

2010 tax amendment Publication 529 - Additional Material Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications